Follow up on Open Source Hangout

Beth Cron and I had a good conversation with Seth Shaw and Jeremy Gibson about open source records management tools.  If you didn’t have a chance to join us last week, you can still view it at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GRQBUjtOT8.

Here are some of the highlights:

  • Open source tools can be very valuable when they have a strong community around them.  This support leads to active development, which makes for a sustainable tool.  Being able to see other people’s work also provides more entry points to solving your own problem.
  • The potential downside to open source tools is that they tend to have less documentation, and there’s the potential for projects to be abandoned.
  • Seth mentioned an interview on The SIgnal about using open source tools in cultural heritage institutions.  You can find it at https://blogs.loc.gov/thesignal/2013/01/when-is-open-source-software-the-right-choice-for-cultural-heritage-organizations-an-interview-with-peter-murray/.
  • Seth has a report pending publication as part of OCLC’s Demystifying Born Digital series (http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/born-digital-reports.html).
  • Jeremy pointed out that one of the benefits of open source tools is that you can more easily find tools that do one thing very well — and then stitch those solutions together to accomplish all of your RM needs.
  • In answer to a query about extracting metadata from media files, Jeremy pointed to MediaInfo and JHOVE.
  • One of the particular gaps identified in existing open source tools is one to handle redactions.
  • Before adopting a records management tool, it’s important to document your functional requirements and your organizational requirements (e.g., budget, IT support).  Only then can you make sure you’re choosing the right tool for your purposes.
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